Dandy Of The Year 2013: Nathaniel Adams

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For services rendered to the understanding and misunderstanding of dandyism, as well as perpetually cutting a dashing figure, Dandyism.net is pleased to award Nathaniel Adams the distinguished title of Dandy of the Year 2013. (more…)

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The Faces Of Dandyism 2013

Since the release of Callahan & Adams’ “I Am Dandy,” D.net has assiduously followed the media coverage, shining our diabolical monocle on the images chosen to accompany posts, articles and book reviews.

We are self-pleased to unveil a final tally of the top faces of dandyism for 2013. (more…)

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Year Of The Tango’s 100th Anniversary

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Nineteen-thirteen was the year the tango conquered fashionable society, rising from its seedy origins in the brothels of Buenos Aires. On assignment for The Rake, D.net founder Christian Chensvold meditates on this most masculine of social dances. Click here for a PDF of the story.

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Camille Paglia Likes Men (In Theory, That Is)

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Camille Paglia has been our favorite lesbian cultural critic ever since her 1990 book “Sexual Personae,” which exhibited vigorous and often embarrassing insight into dandies, decadents and aesthetes. When it comes to her versus Rhonda Garelick, we certainly think Dr. Paglia has a trifle the preference.

It’s also fun to watch the renegade scholar vex and roil mainstream academic feminists.

To wit, yesterday Dr. Paglia posted an essay at Time.com crediting men not only with dandyism (OK, while not mentioned, it’s certainly implied), but with far less dandyish activities, such as refuse disposal, and inventing the dishwasher.

Men will also become socially useful to enlightened women once again, Paglia assures us, once  the apocalypse comes:

After the next inevitable apocalypse, men will be desperately needed again! Oh, sure, there will be the odd gun-toting Amazonian survivalist gal, who can rustle game out of the bush and feed her flock, but most women and children will be expecting men to scrounge for food and water and to defend the home turf. Indeed, men are absolutely indispensable right now, invisible as it is to most feminists, who seem blind to the infrastructure that makes their own work lives possible. It is overwhelmingly men who do the dirty, dangerous work of building roads, pouring concrete, laying bricks, tarring roofs, hanging electric wires, excavating natural gas and sewage lines, cutting and clearing trees, and bulldozing the landscape for housing developments. It is men who heft and weld the giant steel beams that frame our office buildings, and it is men who do the hair-raising work of insetting and sealing the finely tempered plate-glass windows of skyscrapers 50 stories tall.

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Birds Of A Feather

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Fop together. Via Billionaire.com. For complete photo shoot, head here.

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To Cut A Dash

GREAT EXPECTATIONS

Recently we watched the 2011 BBC production of Charles Dickens’ “Great Expectations,” in which the protagonist, Pip, who is newly risen from poverty by an anonymous benefactor, is told by an admiring peer how he “cuts a dash.”

And indeed he does. Played by actor Douglas Booth, Pip’s impression of energized elegance comes down to a certain set of qualities, all of which require the blessings of Providence.

In brief, to properly cut a dashing figure in society, you need to be:

• Young

• Handsome

• Tall

• Slender

• Rich, or fortified by credit

The 19th century novel was largely centered around the young man, often from the provinces, who goes to the metropolis in search of love and money. Often these characters adopt dandy airs — and machinations. Never are these characters:

• Old

• Ugly

• Short

• Fat

• Poor

Pip, Pip hooray. We should all be so lucky.

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